Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
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Alum Success

Nancy (Braschayko) McNamara, a summa cum laude Laker Alumni from 2006 is attending the University of Michigan School of Medicine.

School of Biological Sciences

Degree Audit and Graduation Procedures

Graduation Procedures

Two semesters before you plan to complete degree requirements and graduate, you must submit a degree audit for each major and minor, and a Graduation Application to the Registrar's Office. The necessary forms may be downloaded from this page and are also available at the Dean's office. The Degree Audit for your major or minor specifies all required courses that have been or must be completed. The audit must be signed by the chair of the school or department offering the major or minor program. Course substitutions and waivers of departmental degree program requirements may be granted only by the chair and approved by the dean of the college offering the major or minor program. You may not be listed in the commencement program unless your Degree Candidacy Form is filed with the assistant to the provost six weeks prior to commencement.

Degree Audit Sheets

NOTE: Right-click on a link select "save as" or "save link as" for the most recent version of each audit sheet. Degree audit forms are available as pdf files. You will need the free Adobe Reader to open/print these audit sheets. B.S. degree audits are also available as Excel Macro-Enabled files. You will need Excel 2007 or later to use this version of an audit sheet. Click here for instructions for using these Excel-based audits.

B.S. Biology
    PreMed Concentration
    PreVet Concentration
pdf
pdf
pdf
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B.S. Conservation Biology
    Human Dimensions Concentration
pdf
pdf
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B.S. Fisheries & Wildlife Management
     Fisheries Concentration
     Wildlife Concentration
pdf
pdf
pdf
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B.S. Fish Health pdf xlsm
B.S. Medical Laboratory Sciences pdf xlsm
A.D. Natural Resources Technology pdf doc
A.D. Marine Technology pdf  

 

Investigat- ing the Use of QPCR: An Early Detection Method for Toxic Cyano- bacterial Bloom

Garrett Aderman

Harmful algal blooms (HABs), including cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHABs), are a global phenomenon. In the US, annual economic loss due to HABs was recently estimated at $82 million. Furthermore, the consensus amongst the scientific community is that the frequency and duration of CHABs in freshwater systems will increase as a result of climate change and anthropogenic nutrient enrichment. Due to the ability of some strains of CHAB genera to produce toxic compounds, larger and more sustained CHAB events will become an even greater threat to drinking water. Of all the known cyantoxoins, one of the most ubiquitous is microcystin (MCY). Humans are primarily exposed to cyantoxins through drinking water consumption and accidental ingestion of recreational water. The increasing risk presented by these toxins requires health officials and utilities to improve their ability to track the occurrence and relative toxicity. Current tracking methods do not distinguish between toxic and non-toxic strains. Biochemical techniques for analyzing the toxins are showing considerable potential as they are relatively simple to run and low cost. My goal was to develop a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method to measure the amount of mcyE gene in a Lake Erie drinking water and compare the levels of the mcyE to toxin produced. This is the first step to determining if the presence of mcyE of the mycrocystin synthestase gene cluster in Microcystits, Planktothrix and Anabaena cells can be used as the quantitative measurement in an early detection warning system for recreational and drinking waters.

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