Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
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Alum Success

Prior to my time at Lake State, my professors rarely learned students' names and my classes often felt impersonal. I didn't realize how important that faculty interaction could be until I spent a few weeks here. The personal attention is motivating, often pushing me to work harder than I would have otherwise.

Fisheries & Wildlife '10

School of Biological Sciences

Programs > Marine Technology

The Associate Degree in Marine Technology prepares students for careers related to oceanography and Great Lakes limnology. There is an increasing need for individuals trained in the field of aquatic science, and the objective of the degree at LSSU is to introduce students to a number of career disciplines within this field. The curriculum is an academically rigorous program where students work closely with faculty to learn the skills necessary for a career in marine technology.

Specifically the curriculum includes options for:

  • Basic Science (math, biology, chemistry)
  • Physical Science (oceanography, meteorology)
  • Cartography (maps, GPS, GIS)
  • Engineering (electrical, robotics, machining)
  • Seamanship (boat handling, first aid, research sampling)
Career Options

The US Coast Guard and Michigan Department of Natural Resources both indicate a growing need for marine technology expertise and there are many career opportunities.

  • Marine science technician
  • Able Seaman
  • Marine research assistant
  • Offshore field technicians
More Information
Other Programs Offered in Biology

 

Location is Everything

LSSU is uniquely located on the shores of the St Marys river and adjacent to 3 of the Laurentian Great Lakes. There is a large maritime shipping industry passing through the Sault Ste. Marie daily. In addition as an international waterway, the St. Mary's river is also home to agencies such as the US Coast Guard, US Border Patrol as well as many fisheries and law enforcement agencies that all require employees with knowledge of marine technology. Sault Ste. Marie MI is regarded as a "working waterfront" which makes Marine Technology training very appropriate for LSSU.

 

Investigat- ing the Use of QPCR: An Early Detection Method for Toxic Cyano- bacterial Bloom

Garrett Aderman

Harmful algal blooms (HABs), including cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHABs), are a global phenomenon. In the US, annual economic loss due to HABs was recently estimated at $82 million. Furthermore, the consensus amongst the scientific community is that the frequency and duration of CHABs in freshwater systems will increase as a result of climate change and anthropogenic nutrient enrichment. Due to the ability of some strains of CHAB genera to produce toxic compounds, larger and more sustained CHAB events will become an even greater threat to drinking water. Of all the known cyantoxoins, one of the most ubiquitous is microcystin (MCY). Humans are primarily exposed to cyantoxins through drinking water consumption and accidental ingestion of recreational water. The increasing risk presented by these toxins requires health officials and utilities to improve their ability to track the occurrence and relative toxicity. Current tracking methods do not distinguish between toxic and non-toxic strains. Biochemical techniques for analyzing the toxins are showing considerable potential as they are relatively simple to run and low cost. My goal was to develop a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method to measure the amount of mcyE gene in a Lake Erie drinking water and compare the levels of the mcyE to toxin produced. This is the first step to determining if the presence of mcyE of the mycrocystin synthestase gene cluster in Microcystits, Planktothrix and Anabaena cells can be used as the quantitative measurement in an early detection warning system for recreational and drinking waters.

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