Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
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Alum Success

I love my job!

Jason, from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, fights the Sea Lamprey in Michigan waters. Video from Fox 17

Jason Krebill '00
Fisheries & Wildlife Management

School of Biological Sciences

Unique Educational Opportunities


LSSU Study Abroad - Download an application here.

LSSU Student Blogs


Harry Dittrich
Harry Dittrich has joined a "one-cubic-foot" expedition with National Geographic photographer David Liittschwager and Christopher Meyer, of the Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of Natural History. Click here to read Dittrich's daily updates.
Check out the class blog relating their activities in Africa during the summer of 2014. (Note: Updates to the blog will be made whenever possible).

Internship Experiences

My experience as an intern at the Detroit Zoo is rewarding and highly essential to my growth as a biological professional. I am in the mammal department so every two weeks I go to a new rotation. By the end of the summer I will have shadowed keepers at seven exhibits. So far I have taken care of and interacted with giraffes, rhinos, zebras, common elands, warthogs, fallow deer, gorillas, chimps, lemurs, camels, elk, and barn animals like horses, yaks, cows, pigs and donkeys. The interns work together on enrichment for the animals, so I have also gotten the chance to interact with red-eyed tree frogs on an amphibian enrichment day. There are certain animals I've bonded with that I never would have considered to be one of my "favorite animals." It is a hard job and demands hours of physical labor, yet I've never felt more in my element at a job site than I do while working with the exotic animals that I've grown to care for so much. - Alexis Schefka, LSSU Conservation Biology major

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Investigat- ing the Use of QPCR: An Early Detection Method for Toxic Cyano- bacterial Bloom

Garrett Aderman

Harmful algal blooms (HABs), including cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHABs), are a global phenomenon. In the US, annual economic loss due to HABs was recently estimated at $82 million. Furthermore, the consensus amongst the scientific community is that the frequency and duration of CHABs in freshwater systems will increase as a result of climate change and anthropogenic nutrient enrichment. Due to the ability of some strains of CHAB genera to produce toxic compounds, larger and more sustained CHAB events will become an even greater threat to drinking water. Of all the known cyantoxoins, one of the most ubiquitous is microcystin (MCY). Humans are primarily exposed to cyantoxins through drinking water consumption and accidental ingestion of recreational water. The increasing risk presented by these toxins requires health officials and utilities to improve their ability to track the occurrence and relative toxicity. Current tracking methods do not distinguish between toxic and non-toxic strains. Biochemical techniques for analyzing the toxins are showing considerable potential as they are relatively simple to run and low cost. My goal was to develop a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method to measure the amount of mcyE gene in a Lake Erie drinking water and compare the levels of the mcyE to toxin produced. This is the first step to determining if the presence of mcyE of the mycrocystin synthestase gene cluster in Microcystits, Planktothrix and Anabaena cells can be used as the quantitative measurement in an early detection warning system for recreational and drinking waters.

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