Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
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Alum Success

“The material covered in LSSU's engineering program provided me a solid foundation for graduate studies. The systematic approach and communication skills needed to tackle engineering projects were taught and then practiced over and over again. In particular I appreciate the many hours spent by the faculty to develop oral presentation skills in each student. As a graduate student now, these skills have proven to be highly beneficial and, to my surprise, obviously not taught to the same extent at many other universities.”

Mark Reese, Mechanical Engineering 2005
Hawaii Natural Energy Institute
School of Ocean & Earth Science and Technology
Graduate Student, University of Hawaii at Manoa

School of Engineering & Technology

New Staubli robot flow line
Our Staubli line has four robots with a Bosch conveyor system and rotary index tables.

Our newest FANUC work cell.

Check out our Robotics Summer Camps for Young Men and Women entering grades 8-12.

Have you been active in FIRST Robotics, Tech or LEGO League? Apply for one of our Robotics Scholarships

We've got robots...

Lake Superior State University is one of the top public universities in the United States with a robotics specialization at the undergraduate level. Companies involved in robotics and automation specifically seek out our graduates.

Our Robotics and Automation Laboratory was recognized by TAC of ABET as one of the most complete and advanced of it kind in the country. It is one of the best educational facilities in North America with modern equipment including vision systems, sensors and rotary index tables, using a variety of software and programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Limited enrollment provides you plenty of personal experience with state-of-the-art equipment.

More than 75 percent of our engineering classes have a laboratory component, including robotics, using industrial grade equipment. Our Robotics and Automation Laboratory features robots manufactured by:

Students in Computer, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering can work toward an option in Robotics and Automation. Those majoring in Manufacturing Engineering Technology, Electrical Engineering Technology are eligible to earn a minor in Robotics Technology. The Industrial Technology program feature courses and technical electives focusing on robotics and programming.

 

STAÜBLI
Devon Clark looks at the gripper fingers of the Staubli

Devon Clark, a mechanical engineer from the 2009-10 senior project Team AIR, checks out the gripper of a Stabli line robot.

Our Staubli line is the most recent addition to the lab. Staübli robots are among the fastest and most articlated with 6 degrees of freedom.

The work cell features four robots with shared rotary index tables and a Bosch continuous palletizing conveyor system that operate as an 8-station system. The line includes tool changing systems, end-of-arm devices, and vision systems. They are operated by programmable logic controllers (PLCs) using DeviceNet and VAL3 software.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



FANUC

Pick and Place DemonstrationSummer camp visitors watch a pick-and-place demonstration by the Fanuc oval line.

Our Fanucs are part of the Arcmate family of robots with six degrees of freedom. They are built by the world's largest robot manufacturer.

The Fanuc work group has four Arcmates surrounded by an oval track. They work together as an 8-station system. Activities are coordinated between the robots with a continuous conveyor system. Karel software is used for programming this workcell.

 

new FANUC rotary work cell FANUC spider bot

Our rotary workcell is comprised of four robots.

  • Two LR Mate 200iC (5H)
  • M-1iA (0.5A) - fondly referred to as the spider/delta robot
  • M-6iB

Senior project team AIM installed the FANUC line 2012-13. Watch the demo here!

 

 

 

 

Optim- ization of Salmon DNA as an Internal Standard for qPCR

Elaina Murray

The Escherichia coli species is a human fecal contamination indicator and as such is used in beach monitoring efforts. Quantifying E. Coli presence in local beach waters helps the health department determine if a beach should be closed. The current method of determination, Colilert, takes 18 hours to produce data. Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR), which measure genetic DNA, is also method used to quantify the number of E. Coli, but it can be done much faster than Colilert. In order to standardize the qPCR results, an internal standard is included which is salmon DNA. This project goes through the process of optimizing the salmon standard curve. Each of the components was modified and the resulting standard curve was analyzed for improvements; the primers and probe were purchased new and the concentrations were varied, the DNA was purchased new and the standard curve concentrations and dilution methods were varied, the DNA was cleaned with a Qiagen kit, and new master mix and bovine serum albumin were purchased and prepared. We found that changes to the concentrations of primers and probe and cleaning the DNA showed an increase of optimization, and that changing the dilution methods had no effect of optimization. A combination of the above modifications may be able to produce an optimized salmon DNA standard curve.

Apply Today!

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