Lake Superior State University
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Alum Success

"I graduated from LSSU in Mechanical Engineering in 1999, and have since had a heavy focus in robotics and systems integration. I spent my first 7 years with FANUC in Rochester Hills as a product manager, and have since worked for Hartness International managing a robotic automation group. We continue to grow at a rapid pace, and will integrate 60+ robots this year and see no slow down in sight. My experience at LSSU has enabled me to take charge in this challenging and growing market."

Matt Job Business Unit Manager Automation Group Hartness International

School of Engineering

Senior Projects 2007-2008

 

Team SVS Logo

Team Superior Vision Systems

Members:

  • James Claus
  • Tim Horrigan
  • Andrew Lucarelli
  • Andrew Richards
  • Aaron Worden

Faculty Advisor:

  • Taskin Padir

Company:

  • Applied Manufacturing Technologies

Industrial Contact:

  • JP Rasaiah

Project Description: Vision Integrated Robotics Workcell

Applied Manufacturing Technologies, Inc. required a portable robotic workcell to demonstrate current technology at tradeshows and open houses. Team SVS designed and built a workcell which integrates a robotic arm, vision system, and conveyor system. It accepts a user-defined product order via a touch screen, and relay the information to the robot arm. The robot fulfills the order through the use of a camera to recognize the products, retrieve them from the conveyor system and place the products on an output shelf.

Links to the 2007-2008 Teams:

Investigat- ing the Use of QPCR: An Early Detection Method for Toxic Cyano- bacterial Bloom

Garrett Aderman

Harmful algal blooms (HABs), including cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHABs), are a global phenomenon. In the US, annual economic loss due to HABs was recently estimated at $82 million. Furthermore, the consensus amongst the scientific community is that the frequency and duration of CHABs in freshwater systems will increase as a result of climate change and anthropogenic nutrient enrichment. Due to the ability of some strains of CHAB genera to produce toxic compounds, larger and more sustained CHAB events will become an even greater threat to drinking water. Of all the known cyantoxoins, one of the most ubiquitous is microcystin (MCY). Humans are primarily exposed to cyantoxins through drinking water consumption and accidental ingestion of recreational water. The increasing risk presented by these toxins requires health officials and utilities to improve their ability to track the occurrence and relative toxicity. Current tracking methods do not distinguish between toxic and non-toxic strains. Biochemical techniques for analyzing the toxins are showing considerable potential as they are relatively simple to run and low cost. My goal was to develop a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method to measure the amount of mcyE gene in a Lake Erie drinking water and compare the levels of the mcyE to toxin produced. This is the first step to determining if the presence of mcyE of the mycrocystin synthestase gene cluster in Microcystits, Planktothrix and Anabaena cells can be used as the quantitative measurement in an early detection warning system for recreational and drinking waters.

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