Lake Superior State University
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Alum Success

“The material covered in LSSU's engineering program provided me a solid foundation for graduate studies. The systematic approach and communication skills needed to tackle engineering projects were taught and then practiced over and over again. In particular I appreciate the many hours spent by the faculty to develop oral presentation skills in each student. As a graduate student now, these skills have proven to be highly beneficial and, to my surprise, obviously not taught to the same extent at many other universities.”

Mark Reese, Mechanical Engineering 2005
Hawaii Natural Energy Institute
School of Ocean & Earth Science and Technology
Graduate Student, University of Hawaii at Manoa

School of Engineering

Senior Projects 2007-2008

 

Team SVS Logo

Team Superior Vision Systems

Members:

  • James Claus
  • Tim Horrigan
  • Andrew Lucarelli
  • Andrew Richards
  • Aaron Worden

Faculty Advisor:

  • Taskin Padir

Company:

  • Applied Manufacturing Technologies

Industrial Contact:

  • JP Rasaiah

Project Description: Vision Integrated Robotics Workcell

Applied Manufacturing Technologies, Inc. required a portable robotic workcell to demonstrate current technology at tradeshows and open houses. Team SVS designed and built a workcell which integrates a robotic arm, vision system, and conveyor system. It accepts a user-defined product order via a touch screen, and relay the information to the robot arm. The robot fulfills the order through the use of a camera to recognize the products, retrieve them from the conveyor system and place the products on an output shelf.

Links to the 2007-2008 Teams:

Measure- ment of CI/LI Additive in Military Jet Fuel by Infrared Spectro- metry

Christine Larkin

The overall objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing infrared spectrometry to measure Corrosion Inhibitor/Lubricity Improver (CI/LI) additive in military fuels. Four methodologies were evaluated, but only one methodology was found to be somewhat effective. The Direct Sample, Direct Sample with Standard Addition, and Concentrated Sample methodologies were ineffective. The Concentrated Sample with Standard Addition methodology was effective at correlating concentration and transmittance or absorbance within a single additive brand, but the correlation was not universally applicable across all CI/LI additive brands. It was also found that the absorbance variance of blank fuel samples completely encompassed the measurements of fuel with additives in them. This indicates that the instrument would be unable to accurately assess the concentration of CI/LI additive in a fuel sample of unknown CI/LI concentration. For this technology to be feasible, a different calibration curve would be needed for each commercial additive brand that the Army uses and it would only be capable of measuring additive concentrations as additive is being added to fuel or for the verification of additive injection equipment.

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