Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
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Alum Success

“I chose LSSU expecting a very good engineering education. What I didn’t expect was faculty with real-world engineering experience and abilities, labs with real-world equipment, projects with real-world outcomes, and an entire campus staff with real interest in my success, as a student and yet today. My LSSU engineering education has created or supported every desired career opportunity. LSSU was absolutely the right place for me.”

Dan Goodrich,
Mechanical Engineering 1999,
Vehicle Test & Development,
Electronic Brake Systems Group

School of Engineering

Senior Projects 2009-2010

Team PAS Logo

 

Team Precision Automated Solutions

Members:

  • Drew Dewit
  • Jason Fall
  • Ryan Kruger
  • Wes Moilanen
  • Brandon Roy

Faculty Advisor:

  • Prof. Jim Devaprasad

Company:

  • Lake Superior State University

Industrial Contact:

  • Mr. Jon Coullard

Project Description: Robotic Automation Flow Line - Mechanical

Team PAS, in partnership with team AIR, has designed and implemented a 4-robot automation flow line in LSSU’s robotics lab. The line consists of four Staubli industrial robots, a PLC with DeviceNet, a conveyor system, four vision systems, robotics tool changers, end of arm devices, and several other flow line sensors and components. The team selected and integrated a pallet conveyor system, designed and manufactured end-of-arm tooling, installed and integrated components, and provided PLC programming. Automated assembly of model zambonis will be demonstrated.

Links to the 2009-2010 Senior Projects Teams:

Alternative Management of Anaerobic Landfill Bioreactors for Improved Energy Potential

Josh Kuzimski

Converting municipal solid waste to usable energy is an emergent and growing method for modern waste management. Through microbial facilitation of methanogenesis, methane gas can be extracted from landfill bioreactors to yield a significant amount of usable energy. The hypothesis was that a sufficient addition of sodium acetate to a controlled bioreactor environment would promote larger growth of methanogenic microbes and subsequently promote a greater amount of methane relative to a control (Madigan et al, 2003). In order to simulate an anaerobic bioreactor environment, the method for the study took place in modular sections to cover the design, construction and operation of laboratory scale bioreactors. Upon completion of bioreactor engineering, the biological and chemical components were scrutinized to match ideal conditions of a landfill. Methanosarcina was the chosen genus of the methanogen family to seed the bioreactors, and a total elemental analysis of the waste source was analyzed to approximate methane yield. Over 557 hours, each bioreactor produced approximately 1.3 liters of biogas with less than 1% containing methane. Given analysis through gas chromatography, the bioreactors may have had stunted methane production do to presence of argon gas in the headspace and/or low C/N ratio of the waste. The presence of argon should have been replaced with nitrogen, and the waste source should have contained more carbon per nitrogen. The generation-3 design of constructed bioreactors was successful in containing all gasses, liquids, and solids internally, however did not produce enough methane biogas to accept or reject the hypothesis.

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