Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
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Alum Success

"I graduated from LSSU in Mechanical Engineering in 1999, and have since had a heavy focus in robotics and systems integration. I spent my first 7 years with FANUC in Rochester Hills as a product manager, and have since worked for Hartness International managing a robotic automation group. We continue to grow at a rapid pace, and will integrate 60+ robots this year and see no slow down in sight. My experience at LSSU has enabled me to take charge in this challenging and growing market."

Matt Job Business Unit Manager Automation Group Hartness International

School of Engineering

Senior Projects 2010-2011

 

PRS

Team PRS

Pioneering Race Systems

PRS web picture PRS Team picture

 

Members:

  • Steve Wilson

Faculty Advisor:

  • Mr. Jon Coullard

Company:

  • Lake Superior State University

Industrial Contact:

  • Prof. Paul Duesing

Project Description:Upgrade of SAE Mini Baja Transmission

PRS was given the task of designing and building a more robust transmission incorporating stronger chains and heavy duty sprockets, and redesigning the chain tensioning system of the SAE Mini Baja vehicle. The vehicle required greater durability for the harsh conditions of competition which includes hill climbs, mud bogs and rock crawls. The result is a transmission that requires less down time for repairs, providing a more competitive vehicle.

Links to the 2010-2011 Teams:

Measure- ment of CI/LI Additive in Military Jet Fuel by Infrared Spectro- metry

Christine Larkin

The overall objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing infrared spectrometry to measure Corrosion Inhibitor/Lubricity Improver (CI/LI) additive in military fuels. Four methodologies were evaluated, but only one methodology was found to be somewhat effective. The Direct Sample, Direct Sample with Standard Addition, and Concentrated Sample methodologies were ineffective. The Concentrated Sample with Standard Addition methodology was effective at correlating concentration and transmittance or absorbance within a single additive brand, but the correlation was not universally applicable across all CI/LI additive brands. It was also found that the absorbance variance of blank fuel samples completely encompassed the measurements of fuel with additives in them. This indicates that the instrument would be unable to accurately assess the concentration of CI/LI additive in a fuel sample of unknown CI/LI concentration. For this technology to be feasible, a different calibration curve would be needed for each commercial additive brand that the Army uses and it would only be capable of measuring additive concentrations as additive is being added to fuel or for the verification of additive injection equipment.

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