Lake Superior State University
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Alum Success

Jean has testified in front of the State of Michigan Legislature in regards to adoption issues and resolutions. She continues to demonstrate adoption leadership as an active member of the Executive Committee and Board Member of the Michigan Federation of Child and Family Agencies, which introduces and advocates state and legal policies governing children’s issues including adoption. Jean has also served on the Board of Directors for the Michigan Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers promoting fair and ethical practice in the social work field.

"I love what I do and I don't think of running an Adoption Agency as a job,
but rather as my vocation/calling in life. I cannot imagine doing anything
else."

Jean M. Stenzel '86
Criminal Justice Major

Criminal Justice
Outstanding reputation for producing well educated and well trained criminal justice practitioners
Alumni
   

Our graduates succeed!

Clayton Graham
Probate Judge for Mackinac County, MI

Scott Strait
Sheriff of Mackinac County, MI

Steve Nusbaum
Immigration and Customs Enforcement Headquarters, Office of International Affairs in Washington, DC. Steve was the Assistant Attache’ in Abu Dhabi, UAE and has worked in Dubai, Riyadh, KSA and Islamabad, Pakistan.

Joel Postma
FBI agent, Detroit, MI

Michael Bitnar
Chippewa County Undersheriff

Robery Marchand
Sault Tribal Police Chief

Joe Micolo
Kinross District Police Chief

Tony Fazarri
United States, Customs Port Deputy Chief

Additional Employers of Criminal Justice Graduates:

  • Multiple city and county law enforcement departments/agencies (too many to list!)
  • Bay Mills Police Dept.
  • Bureau of Immigration/Customs Enf.
  • Bureau of Indian Affairs
  • California State Crime Lab
  • Canada Customs & Revenue Agency
  • Central Michigan Univ. Police Dept.
  • Coast Guard Investigative Service
  • Department of Justice - US Marshals
  • Dept. of Attorney General
  • Dept. of Defense
  • Dept. of Homeland Security
  • Dept. of Natural Resources
  • Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigations
  • Federal Bureau of Prisons
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
  • George Washington Univ. Police Dept.
  • Lake Superior State University
  • Little River Band of Ottawa Indians PS
  • Michigan State Police
  • Michigan State Police Crime Labs
  • Michigan State University Police
  • Ministry of Public Safety & Security
  • Montana Department of Corrections
  • Ontario Provincial Police
  • Rochester, Minnesota Police Department
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  • Sault Ste. Marie Police Department
  • Sault Tribe
  • United States Marshals Service
  • Univ. of Florida Police Dept.
  • U.S. Customs
  • Wisconsin State Crime Lab - Wausau

  

"While many of our graduates are working in law enforcement, corrections and related fields, some accept positions within the federal government (FBI, DEA, Border Security, etc.).

Our graduates are also finding careers with private security firms, criminal laboratories, private practice attorneys, and education. Professors Gordier and Schaefer are both alums of LSSU's Criminal Justice and Fire Science programs, respectively."

--James Blashill
Emertis Professor

Investigat- ing the Use of QPCR: An Early Detection Method for Toxic Cyano- bacterial Bloom

Garrett Aderman

Harmful algal blooms (HABs), including cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHABs), are a global phenomenon. In the US, annual economic loss due to HABs was recently estimated at $82 million. Furthermore, the consensus amongst the scientific community is that the frequency and duration of CHABs in freshwater systems will increase as a result of climate change and anthropogenic nutrient enrichment. Due to the ability of some strains of CHAB genera to produce toxic compounds, larger and more sustained CHAB events will become an even greater threat to drinking water. Of all the known cyantoxoins, one of the most ubiquitous is microcystin (MCY). Humans are primarily exposed to cyantoxins through drinking water consumption and accidental ingestion of recreational water. The increasing risk presented by these toxins requires health officials and utilities to improve their ability to track the occurrence and relative toxicity. Current tracking methods do not distinguish between toxic and non-toxic strains. Biochemical techniques for analyzing the toxins are showing considerable potential as they are relatively simple to run and low cost. My goal was to develop a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method to measure the amount of mcyE gene in a Lake Erie drinking water and compare the levels of the mcyE to toxin produced. This is the first step to determining if the presence of mcyE of the mycrocystin synthestase gene cluster in Microcystits, Planktothrix and Anabaena cells can be used as the quantitative measurement in an early detection warning system for recreational and drinking waters.

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