Lake Superior State University
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Alum Success

"LSSU has a great reputation for placing students in graduate and professional schools. Many of my classmates from LSSU are now pursuing graduate and professional studies at some of the finest universities in Canada and the United States."

"The student-faculty interaction and the ability to conduct research at the undergraduate level really helped me to achieve success in a competitive graduate program. My professors at LSSU were always interested in helping us succeed."

Luke Ferra of Sault Ste. Marie graduated from LSSU in 2006 with a degree in biology and is now working toward a master's degree in epidemiology at University of Western Ontario in London. He plans to continue his studies in the medical sciences.

Luke Fera '06
Biology Major

Prelaw

Acquires analytical and problem-solving skills, critical reading abilities, writing skills, oral communication etc
Prepared
 
Degrees

There is essentially a three-step process in becoming a licensed attorney. First, an individual must complete an undergraduate degree at a college or university. Second, one must then go on to law school to obtain a juris doctorate degree. Finally, successful completion of the state bar exam is required for licensure. In being admitted into law school, the two most important factors that are evaluated by most law schools are undergraduate grades and Law School Admission Test (LSAT) scores — an entrance exam required of nearly all law schools in the United States and some in Canada.

The American Bar Association and most law schools do not recommend any particular undergraduate major before going on to law school. Consequently, a student should choose a major in which he/she has both interest and aptitude. Yet, there are important skills, values, and certain knowledge that can be acquired prior to law school which will assist a student in being successful at law school. Such values and knowledge include: analytical and problem-solving skills, critical reading abilities, writing skills, oral communication and listening abilities, research skills, task organization and management skills, ethical values, and, of course, knowledge of the law. In fact, a prelaw minor is available at LSSU which consists of courses that will assist a prelaw student in further developing these skills, values and knowledge.

Since there is no required prelaw major, the American Bar Association and law schools strongly recommend that law school bound students contact the Prelaw Advisor at their university as early in the educational process as possible. At LSSU, our approach to advising prelaw students is very individualized. We want to help each student fulfill their goals and to be successful at law school and beyond.

The Prelaw Advisor at LSSU can provide individualized guidance with regard to selecting an undergraduate curriculum (both a major and a minor); recommending particular courses that will enhance necessary skills, values and knowledge; assisting in the law school admission process; and providing relevant career and professional trend information.

Although there is no recommended or required prelaw curriculum, there are some excellent options that students may want to consider at LSSU. The following LSSU programs include key components with regard to legal knowledge as well as writing, analytical and research skills:

  • Political Science—Prelaw Concentration (major)
  • Prelaw (minor)

Students should seek guidance from LSSU’s Prelaw Advisor as early as possible to ensure they are individually counseled with regards to their respective interests, undergraduate curriculum choice, as well as personal and professional goals

 

  

 

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Character- ization of Yellow Pigments in Freshwater Flavo- bacteria

Ashley Ryckman

The yellow color of Flavobacteria is due to the presence of carotenoids and flexirubin-type pigments. These complex chemical structures have shown to produce antioxidant properties, as well as antibacterial activity. The KOH test and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to characterize carotenoid and flexirubin pigment production in three strains of Flavorbacteria: FR 87, FR Y, and FR 93. Optimization of pigment and separation was performed by quant-prep HPLC. Separation of four pigment fractions from each strain was attained using semi-prep HPLC. Antibacterial activity of the pigment fractions was tested using a MTT Assay. Fexirubin biosynthesis genes, darA and darB, of related pigment producing Flavobacteria were used to compare flexirubin pigments in FR 87. The three strains were determined to produce the carotenoid, Zeaxanthin. FR 87 produced 13 flexirubin pigments, FR Y produced 14 flexirubin pigments and FR 93 produced 20 flexirubin-type pigments. It was determined that compounds in all three strains demonstrated antibacterial activity. The flexirubin biosynthesis gene, darA, is 89.9% similar to Flavobacterium johnsoniae, and 73.2% similar to Flavobacterium psychrophilum.

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