Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
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Alum Success

Since graduating from LSSU's Communication program in 2008, Ben has enjoyed success in the insurance industry due in part to the skills he learned at LSSU. He currently is an Operations Supervisor for Farmers Insurance Group in Grand Rapids, MI and leads a team of 15 in a direct to customer contact center. The department plays a major role in Farmer's market strategy by supporting the local agent distribution channel with extended hours via phone and chat. "The interpersonal and organizational communication skills I learned at LSSU are used on a daily basis in insurance. Insurance is an intangible product that is more of an interpersonal relationship between the policy holder and the company", says Ben. "My primary job is coaching team members to effectively analyze and communicate complex situations in a way our customers understand using straightforward and proactive interaction models. The curriculum at LSSU not only prepared in my current job, but also prepared me to know how to transfer these skills to my team."

Ben Momber - BA Communication 2008

Prelaw

Acquires analytical and problem-solving skills, critical reading abilities, writing skills, oral communication etc
Prepared
 
Degrees

There is essentially a three-step process in becoming a licensed attorney. First, an individual must complete an undergraduate degree at a college or university. Second, one must then go on to law school to obtain a juris doctorate degree. Finally, successful completion of the state bar exam is required for licensure. In being admitted into law school, the two most important factors that are evaluated by most law schools are undergraduate grades and Law School Admission Test (LSAT) scores — an entrance exam required of nearly all law schools in the United States and some in Canada.

The American Bar Association and most law schools do not recommend any particular undergraduate major before going on to law school. Consequently, a student should choose a major in which he/she has both interest and aptitude. Yet, there are important skills, values, and certain knowledge that can be acquired prior to law school which will assist a student in being successful at law school. Such values and knowledge include: analytical and problem-solving skills, critical reading abilities, writing skills, oral communication and listening abilities, research skills, task organization and management skills, ethical values, and, of course, knowledge of the law. In fact, a prelaw minor is available at LSSU which consists of courses that will assist a prelaw student in further developing these skills, values and knowledge.

Since there is no required prelaw major, the American Bar Association and law schools strongly recommend that law school bound students contact the Prelaw Advisor at their university as early in the educational process as possible. At LSSU, our approach to advising prelaw students is very individualized. We want to help each student fulfill their goals and to be successful at law school and beyond.

The Prelaw Advisor at LSSU can provide individualized guidance with regard to selecting an undergraduate curriculum (both a major and a minor); recommending particular courses that will enhance necessary skills, values and knowledge; assisting in the law school admission process; and providing relevant career and professional trend information.

Although there is no recommended or required prelaw curriculum, there are some excellent options that students may want to consider at LSSU. The following LSSU programs include key components with regard to legal knowledge as well as writing, analytical and research skills:

  • Political Science—Prelaw Concentration (major)
  • Prelaw (minor)

Students should seek guidance from LSSU’s Prelaw Advisor as early as possible to ensure they are individually counseled with regards to their respective interests, undergraduate curriculum choice, as well as personal and professional goals

 

  

 

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Economic Analysis of the Soo Locks

Joseph Reath

In this project, we focus on the relationship between the economy and the shipping through the Soo Locks. Using data collected from the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the United States Army Corps of Engineers, we analyze the relationship between net tonnage through the Soo Locks and various economic measures, including a variety of components of real GDP of the U.S. and of the states bordering the Great Lakes.

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