Lake Superior State University
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Alum Success

Jennifer Johnson

"Lake Superior State University really did give me a great education. LSSU competes not only in the Midwest but Nationally as well."

Jennifer Johnson '08
LSSU Fisheries & Wildlife Mgmt graduate

Currently enrolled in the graduate program at the University of Georgia



    A bugler starts the day at Fort Brady, with the Jail House (aka East Hall) in the background.

    Daily life at Fort Brady began at sunrise and ended at sunset. Each morning at sunrise a soldier would play his bugle into a large metal megaphone, projecting the strains of Reveille across the fort grounds. Buglers were stationed in front of the post guardhouse, known today as East Hall.

    Meals were served in the cafeteria located between the infantry barracks. Throughout the day troopers could have hot meals served at the snack bar, an underground restaurant located in the basement of Brady Hall, which was then used as barracks for officers.


    Snowshoe troopers in training.

    After a hot breakfast soldiers broke down into companies to begin their training.

    Colonel Nash and the snowshoe troopers trained every day for European warfare, often in weather conditions ranging from zero to sixteen degrees below zero. The snowshoe troopers traveled several miles each day through the dense temperate forest of the Upper Peninsula with weapons and military equipment strapped to their backs. The troopers were camouflaged in white long underwear shirts and dark brown pants, used to blend in with the snow. Instead of helmets troopers wore thick, wool ski masks which exposed only eyes and lips.

     


    Ski troopers prepare to depart, with Brady Hall in the background.

    Ski troopers traveled cross country on skis with their weapons strapped to their backs. The troopers wore white tops and green camouflaged pants. During extremely cold weather exercises ski troopers wore long wool coats with a weapons belt around their waists. These weapons belts contained ammunition, first aid kits, and green bandages used for tending wounds.

    The police battalions marched on the fort grounds and patrolled the area surrounding the Sault Locks. When the battalions were not marching they engaged in target practice. The left image below shows the battalions marching, with the horse stable (Fletcher Center), fort library (small white building to left of horse stable) and the maintenance buildings in the background. The right image shows the police battalion preparing to fire their weapons at a public display at the fort, circa winter 1941. The police battalion was assigned to the Fort in the Summer of 1941 and was dismissed in the Spring of 1942.

English...

Jessica Hirt

Jessica Hirt
English

"One of my favorite things about LSSU is its size. The classrooms, especially as you get to the upper levels, get smaller, so you not only have a chance to discuss your ideas in an honest, supportive manner, but you also get to know your professors and classmates. The upper level courses really allow you to focus on what you love, and the small class size allows you to have time to share and to discuss your ideas."

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