Lake Superior State University
Lake Superior State University
 
Related Sites

 

Alum Success

Loralei Premo

Loralei Premo '07
Biology Major

Communications and SPC Administrator, Drinking Source Water Protection Division of the Sault Ste. Marie Region Conservation Authority (Ontario)

"Most natural science classes at LSSU offer students as much hands-on experience (lab hours) as lecture hours, which ensures that the university experience prepares us for the real world careers, whether you work at a desk or out in the field, or both. There are endless advantages and opportunities available to LSSU students due to its location on an international border.

I found my career path on campus when my advisor posted a job for the Bi-national Public Advisory Council (BPAC), a group dedicated to and overseeing the clean-up the St. Mary's River. I was able to gain experience and network on both sides of the border, ultimately finding full-time employment before I graduated with my biology degree."


Sketched photograph was engraved in metal in the early 1840's for the Soo News (the local newspaper of the time.)

After the War of 1812 ended and the Treaty of Paris was signed with Great Britain, the Falls of the Saint Mary's River were left unoccupied, controlled by the British garrison stationed on Drummond Island. General Hugh Brady moved his troops from Sackett's Harbor to Sault Ste. Marie in 1822 to construct a stockade and barracks on the land ceded by the treaty of 1820 to the Chippewa Indians. Brady first took over the former Nolin house and began the erection of a stockade, with blockhouses at the southwest and northeast corners. Pickets twelve feet high set four feet in the ground enclosed the principal buildings of the post in a solid stockade. Fort Brady was completed before the close of 1822 and stood on that location until 1892 when it was moved to Ashmun Hill.

Sault Life Revolved Around Fort Brady

Fort Brady was very important in the life of Sault Ste. Marie, occupying 26.14 acres extending 550 feet along the bank of the river and running parallel to Portage Street. The fort had a large garden, a cemetery, and a grove of large trees lying south of Portage. The main entrance was located on Portage Street, where a sentry with a rifle would pace back and forth. Just inside the entrance and to the right were long piles of cordwood used for heating the fort buildings because little, if any coal was used for heating. On holidays people would gather to watch the soldiers parade down Portage Street. The cannon would be fired and bugle calls called at random. Every spring activities were held at the fort including foot races, horse races, dog races, and canoe races. The races would take place on Water Street and at the base of the Saint Mary's River, starting at Sugar Island. Indian men frequently defeated American soldiers in canoe races.

Previous Stop:
Introduction

Robotics...

Dereck Wonnacutt

Dereck Wonnacutt
Robotics and Computer Science

"Lake Superior State is the only robotics program of its kind in the country. I can work up any research or senior project idea with a professor or my advisor. I studied for a year in Japan through LSSU's connection with the Japan Center for Michigan Universities, and became fluent in Japanese. A Japanese company called Fanuc makes most of the robots in our lab. I'd like to roll my senior research project into a career with Fanuc that bridges the two countries and cultures."

Apply Today!

Home » Fort Brady > Fort Brady History > First Fort
Share this page with your friends: